Thursday, August 15, 2013

How to Combine Colors in your Wardrobe, using The Color Wheel!


What to Wear

Ever wonder how some of your favorite fashionistas put colors together to create eye-catching and fabulously colorful outfits?

The color wheel! It is an excellent wardrobe tool! In fact it was one of the first things I learned about when I studied Interior Design and Makeup Artistry. Figuring it out isn’t too complicated.

Here’s a quick breakdown:


You can make the following combos using the color wheel as your guide:
1. Colors directly next to each other (i.e. yellow and yellow-orange; yellow and yellow-green; violet and blue-violet, etc.)
2. Colors that form right (90 degree) angles with each other (i.e. yellow and red-orange; blue and violet-red; green and orange, etc.)
3. Colors directly across from each other (i.e. yellow and violet; blue and orange; red and green, etc.)
4. Colors that form a T (i.e. blue, orange, and violet-red; yellow, violet, and red-orange; yellow, blue-green, and red-orange, etc.)
5. Colors that form an X (i.e. blue, orange, violet-red, and yellow, violet, blue-green, and red-orange, etc.)
Since brown is a neutral, it will go with virtually any color on the color wheel. I love to pair a chocolate brown with cobalt blue or fuchsia or bright red—such a fun and bold combo. Of course white, black, and the hues of blue found in denim are also neutrals that go with just about anything.



Colors that are a part of a “color family” also apply. So for instance, you can substitute pink with red and still be able to pull off the combos based on the color wheel (i.e. we see that blue and red form a right angle with each other–then in Elise Neal’s outfit she wore fuchsia and cobalt blue). Get it? Good.

As for accessories, I’m definitely not a fan of colored jewelry or belts, but go crazy with colored hats, bags, shoes, or scarves. When choosing jewelry, pair gold (or gold-toned) jewelry with your warm colored outfits. Warm colors have a yellow, gold, or orange undertone to them. Wear silver (or silver-toned) jewelry with your cool colored outfits. Cool colors have a blue, pink, or red undertone to them. Since colors are broken down by hue, temperature, intensity, and tone any single hue can be either warm or cool. Just look at the undertones.

You can also use the color wheel when coming up with color combinations for your makeup. It can help you decide which makeup color to wear so that you don’t match your eyeshadow with your outfit. Check out how Rihanna paired gorgeous purple eyeshadow with her red frock:



And there you go—a breakdown of how to use color combinations to spruce up your wardrobe. You’ll be looking more fab in no time.

Hope this helps! ;)

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

How to Find Your Undertone and Choose the Right Foundation


Finding the right shade of base to match your complexion always seems like a daunting task. And according to Jamie Greenberg, a celebrity makeup artist for Mark., most of us aren’t wearing the right color anyway. Often foundations and concealers prompt you to choose a shade based on your undertone, especially when shopping online. But if you don’t know what your undertone is, that isn’t much help!
Foundations usually come recommended for one of three undertone types: “cool,” “neutral,” or “warm.” It’s possible, though, to fall somewhere in between (you could be “neutral-warm,” for instance). To get you closer to finding the perfect match, we asked Greenberg to outline how to figure out your undertone. Note, these same principles apply on all skin tones, from very fair to dark. And remember, if you're having trouble DIY’ing it, you can always ask a professional makeup artist for a skin analysis.

Those with cool undertones will notice their skin has a pink, red, or blue tinge to it.
You have a “cool” undertone if:
• If the veins on your wrist are blue or purple
• If silver jewelry flatters your skin more than gold
• When you look at your skin in the sun, it appears blue-ish


If you have neutral undertones, your skin is neither pink/red/blue nor yellow/gold/peach, but somewhere in between.

You have a “neutral” undertone if:
• The veins on your wrist are blue-green
• Both gold and silver jewelry flatter your skin
• When you look at your skin in the sun, it appears greenish


Those with warm undertones will notice their skin has a yellow, gold, or peach tinge to it.
You have a “warm” undertone if:
• The veins on your wrist are slightly green or olive
• Gold jewelry flatters your skin more than silver
• When you look at your skin in the sun, it appears yellowish

Three More Tips for Finding the Right Foundation

So now you know your undertone, you can start to narrow the field. If you’re trying foundations in a store, here are Greenberg’s three tips to help you find the right one.

1: Prep Skin First

Before you do anything, exfoliate and moisturize your skin. “Slough off those dead skin cells and prepare that canvas so it can honestly accept color,” says Greenberg. “If your skin is sweaty or isn't totally clean, the color won't be accurate!”

2: Test in Good Lighting

Make sure you test your foundation in good lighting. It's always a good idea to first test it out in one location, and then go somewhere else with different lighting to see if it still matches. And make sure you're wearing white, as other colors might alter your tone. Greenberg warns that you should never try to correct your color with a base. “It's best to match your undertone, and then if you feel pale, you can always add bronzer or blush for dimension,” she says.

3: Match The Color You See Most

There are three parts of the body you have to think about: the face, the neck, and the d├ęcolletage—and Greenberg points out that all of these can differ. “The most natural thing would be to match your neck, but because of sun exposure and elements, the face/d├ęcolletage are often darker than your neck,” she says. To even things out, Greenberg suggests choosing a product that matches the color you see the most, and then applying base to the face and neck so that you get even color all over.

Saturday, August 10, 2013

Makeup Techniques & Terms Verified

Makeup Techniques

Fashion Makeup
Fashion makeup is used in magazine photography as well as on the fashion runway. Avant-garde makeup is also an applicable technique used for projects that require experimental themes. Fashion makeup is also commonly used in television and film ranging for the natural prime look to more sophisticated applications such as color balance.
 
Theatrical Makeup
Stage makeup is used as a method in conjunction with stage lighting to highlight the actors' faces in order make expressions visible to the audience from moderate distances. This often includes defining the eyes and lips as well as the highlights and lowlights of the facial bones.
 
Special Effects Makeup (FX makeup)
The use of special effects techniques enhancing physical features to exhibit metaphysical characteristics as well as fantasy makeup. The use of prosthetics and plaster casting are also required for projects that entails non-human appearances. Accents such as theatrical blood and ooze are also techniques applicable to this type of makeup.
 
Airbrushing
The use of an airbrush which is a small air-operated device that sprays various media including alcohol and water-based makeup by a process of nebulization. The earliest record of this type of cosmetic application dates back to the 1925 film version of Ben-Hur, it has recently been re-popularized by the advent of HDTV and digital photography, where the camera focuses on higher depths of detail. Liquid foundations that are high in coverage but thin in texture are applied with the airbrush for full coverage without a heavy build-up of product.
 
Bridal Makeup
Bridal makeup is a new segment in a makeup artist's repertoire. From ethnic, to glamorous, to contemporary, makeup artists are now an important part of wedding planning worldwide.
 
High Definition
This is an art which involves the use of light reflectors and ingredients such as minerals to give the skin a flawless finish. This was developed due to the further development of high definition mediums and the cost implications of airbrush makeup.

INFUSED WATER- A NEW CONCEPT.


Here are their benefits to help with detoxification energy and hydration. put as much fruit in water as you like and let the water sit for at least 30 minutes before drinking

(1) Green tea, mint, lime----fat burning, digestion, headaches, congestion and breath freshener.

(2) Strawberry,kiwi-----cardiovascular health, immune system protection, blood sugar regulation, digestion

(3) Cucumber, lime, lemon---- water weight management, bloating, appetite control, hydration, digestion

(4) Lemon, lime, orange-----digestion vitamin C, immune defense, heartburn, (drink this one at room temperature)

Do not keep longer than 48 hours you can put more water using the same fruit, but discard after 48 hours.


Reflexology Hand Chart